Eric Nusser

Member
Get In touch

Eric Nusser brought his passion for social justice to Terrell Marshall Law Group in 2016 and became a member in 2022. He has obtained successful results on behalf of plaintiffs and class members, including an $8.2 million settlement on behalf of thousands of package delivery drivers, a $1.75 million settlement benefitting hundreds of security guards, and substantial monetary and injunctive relief in various workers’ rights, civil rights, and consumer protection class actions. 

Eric graduated cum laude from Seattle University School of Law, where he focused his studies on labor and employment law and civil litigation. While a student, he served as a law clerk for TMLG, as an extern to the Honorable Lisa R. Worswick at the Washington Court of Appeals, Div. II, and as a summer associate for the Unemployment Law Project. He also served as president of the Seattle University Labor and Employment Law Association, was a three-time recipient of the Presidential Law Scholarship, and contributed more than 200 hours to the Pro Bono Pledge Program. 

Eric is a native Seattleite and loves everything about the Pacific Northwest. He enjoys spending time with his wife, two dogs, and stepson, going to concerts, and hiking, mountain biking, and trail running anywhere with hills and trees.  

Education

  • Seattle University School of Law – J.D., Cum Laude (2016)
    • President, Labor and Employment Law Association, 2015-2016
    • CALI Excellence for the Future Award, Appellate Litigation Seminar: Labor and Employment Law, 2015
    • Presidential Law Scholarship, 2013, 2014, 2015
    • Metzger Legal Writing Scholarship, 2014
    • Summer Grant Award, Public Interest Law Foundation, 2014
    • Pro Bono Pledge Program, 220 Hours Served
  • University of Washington – B.A., Philosophy (2013)
    • Dean’s List, 2012, 2013
    • Member, Tau Sigma National Honor Society
    • Minors: Labor Rights & Political Science

Previous Experience

  • Law Clerk, Terrell Marshall Law Group 
  • Extern for the Honorable Lisa R. Worswick, Washington Court of Appeals, Div. II 
  • Summer Associate, The Unemployment Law Project 
  • President of the Seattle University Labor and Employment Law Association 

Bar Admissions

  • Washington

Court Admissions

  • USDC for the Western District of Washington 
  • USDC for the Eastern District of Washington 
  • US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit 
  • US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

Professional Organizations and Activities

  • Washington Employment Lawyers Association
  • King County Bar Association
  • Public Justice
  • National Employment Lawyers Association
  • Washington State Association for Justice
  • American Association for Justice

Publication & Press

Cross, et al. v. Amazon.com Inc., et al.

Kellogg v. Churchome, et al.

Brown, et al. v. Lexington County, et al.

Stelman, et al. v. Amazon.com Inc., et al.

Ortiz, et al. v. Amazon.com Inc., et al.

Case Highlights

Wage & Hour

  • Ortiz, et al. v. Amazon.com, Inc., et al.—Filed in 2017 on behalf of nearly 3,000 Amazon delivery drivers who alleged violations of state wage and hour law including rest and meal break, overtime, and off-the-clock violations. The King County Superior Court granted final approval of the $8.2 million settlement on May 7, 2021.
  • Hudson v. Oatridge Security Grp., Inc., et al. —Filed in 2018 on behalf of private security officers who allege wage and hour violation including rest and meal break and overtime violations. The King County Superior Court granted final approval of the $1.75 million settlement on December 9, 2021.
  • Tschosik, et al. v. Diamond Freight Systems, Inc., et al.—Filed in 2016 on behalf of Washington employees who alleged wage and hour violations including rest and meal break, overtime, and off-the-clock violations. The Spokane County Superior Court granted final approval of the $385,000 settlement on August 30, 2019.

Civil Rights 

  • Brown, et al. v. Lexington County, et al.—Filed in 2017 on behalf of thousands of impoverished people who were failing to receive assistance of counsel when facing low-level criminal charges in Lexington County magistrate courts. Many of these people were subsequently arrested and incarcerated for nonpayment of fines and fees without assistance of counsel or proper hearings on ability to pay. Plaintiffs brought claims under the Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution, and the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina certified the case as a class action. On March 9, 2023, the Court approved a class-wide settlement of the Sixth Amendment claim, under which the County agreed to more than triple the funding it provides for indigent defense in its magistrate courts. The parties also reached a settlement on the Fourteenth Amendment claims under which the individual Plaintiffs received monetary relief.
  • Paredes Garcia v. Harborstone Credit Union—Filed in 2021 on behalf of consumers who participate in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or who otherwise do not hold United States citizenship but reside in the United States. The plaintiff alleges that Harborstone has engaged in a policy and practice of depriving consumers of the right to contract based on their alienage status in violation of 42 U.S.C. § 1981. The plaintiff also alleges that Harborstone has engaged in a policy and practice of obtaining consumer reports on these individuals in violation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1681b. The parties entered into a settlement agreement on December 19, 2022, that will award damages to hundreds of settlement class members and changed Harborstone’s lending policies. Approval of the settlement is currently pending in the Western District of Washington.
  • Hashi, et al. v. Airport Management Services LLC, et al.Filed in 2018 on behalf of Muslim employees seeking accommodations for their religious beliefs, including the ability to perform daily prayers, time to break their fasts during Ramadan, and the ability to avoid handling or selling pork products. The King County Superior Court granted final approval of a settlement that provided injunctive relief and $300,000 on September 6, 2019.